JACK-O-LANTERNS AND LORE

pumpkin 21

No matter how busy we are, the fact remains that Halloween is just around the corner. There are costumes to make or purchase; there are treats to buy and the porch needs attention. Whether or not you celebrate Halloween, the pumpkin is a fall favorite in homes and I have put together some ravishing ideas for you to see and perhaps make with your Jack-O-Lantern.

pumpkin 14

Interspersed between the wonderful and relatively simple picture ideas, I have also copied some incredible facts about the pumpkin. You will definitely be “in the know” at the dinner table if you share some of the ideas and facts found here.

pumpkin 20

pumpkin 15

Got a snake bite or a few freckles? Pumpkin will clear that right up! Or at least that’s what people thought in the 18th century when pumpkin was often prescribed as a cure-all.

Pumpkin pie dates back to the colonial period, when colonists filled a pumpkin’s interior with milk, spices and honey. The concoction was then baked in hot ashes. Thank goodness the recipe has changed since then.

pumpkin 12

Even though pumpkin carving is an iconic American tradition, turnips, potatoes, or beets were the original Jack-O-Lanterns. When immigrants from Ireland, England, and Scotland arrived in North America, they began using pumpkins instead. Native to the Americas, not only were pumpkins much larger, making it easier to carve, they were also readily available.

pumpkin 19

A pumpkin is a pumpkin is a pumpkin, right? Not so! Pumpkins come in more than 50 varieties.

pumpkin 6

While most recognize the classic Howden Field variety, you may not have heard of the Atlantic Giant—which grows to more than 100 pounds—the precious Little Boo, or the miniature Munchkin varieties.

pumpkin 11

Think your Jack-O-Lantern is huge? You’ve got nothing on Scott Cully. In 2010, this determined farmer carved a pumpkin that weighed 1,810 pounds—over 500 pounds more than the average weight of an American Saddle Breed Horse!

pumpkin 4

Though this tough fruit originated in Central America, today it grows on almost every continent, including super cold climates like Alaska. The only place you won’t find pumpkins? Antarctica.

pumpkin 7

Pumpkins might seem substantial, but they’re actually 90 percent water. The world’s largest pumpkin on record weighs more than 2,000 pounds. That’s about 10 times more than the world’s largest watermelon, which weighs a measly 268 pounds.

pumpkin 10

The oldest evidence, pumpkin-related seeds dating between 7000 and 5500 BC, was found in Mexico.

 pumpkin 8

The color of pumpkins is derived from the orange pigments abundant in them. The main nutrients are lutein and both alpha and beta carotene, the latter of which generates vitamin A in the body.

pumpkins 18

The word pumpkin originates from the word pepon (πέπων), which is Greek for “large melon”, something round and large. The French adapted this word to pompon, which the British changed to pumpion and later American colonists changed that to the word that is used today, pumpkin.

pumpkin 3

Pumpkin chunking is a competitive activity in which teams build various mechanical devices designed to throw a pumpkin as far as possible. Catapults, trebuchets, ballistas and air cannons are the most common mechanisms. Some pumpkin chunkers breed and grow special varieties of pumpkin under specialized conditions to improve the pumpkin’s chances of surviving a throw.

pumpkin 1

In the Harry Potter novels, pumpkin juice, a favorite drink of the students of Hogwart’s School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, is a recurring element.

pumpkin 22

Starbucks turned this association into a marketing success with its pumpkin spice latte, introduced in 2003…and aren’t we glad?

Happy Pumpkin Hunting Everyone! Stop in LTD 7 soon and let us know which ideas you have tried.

Also, if you have any costume makeup you would like, my daughter, Erika, is booking appointments and there are still a few openings left.

Screen Shot 2015-10-25 at 11.44.06 AM ~ Oct-25

Living the Dream,

Lynne

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s